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A young Mughal prince astride a powerful horse attempts to catch a lance. In the lower part of the painting, a young man holds a tabarzin in his left hand while moving his right hand to his mouth. His index finger touches his lips, a sign of astonishment at this demonstration of equestrian skill.
AKM288.AKM288.7, The Art of Chivalry, Folio from a manuscript of the Ethics of Nasir (Akhlaq-i Nasiri), Fol.138r

© The Aga Khan Museum

Beige paper with a rectangular text box ruled with gold and green thin outlined boarders set to the left hand edge, with 12 lines of script
AKM288.7.f138r.back_AKM288.7, The Art of Chivalry, Folio from a manuscript of the Ethics of Nasir (Akhlaq-i Nasiri), Fol.138v

© The Aga Khan Museum

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The Art of Chivalry, Folio from a manuscript of the Ethics of Nasir (Akhlaq-i Nasiri)
  • Accession Number:AKM288.7
  • Creator:Artist (painter attributed): Kanak Sing
    Author: Nasir al-Din Tusi, Persian, 1201 - 1274
    Created for: Nasir al-Din `Abd al-Rahim
  • Place:Pakistan, Lahore
  • Dimensions:23.9 cm × 14.2 cm
  • Date:ca. 1590-1595
  • Materials and Technique:opaque watercolour, gold, and ink on paper
  • This painting is the first to appear in the Second Discourse of Nasir al-Din Tusi’s text, in a section about skills one should aspire to attain. Some of these skills, such as writing or rhetoric, pertain to the mind, while others, including horsemanship and military command as illustrated here, pertain to the body.

    The Ethics of Nasir describes the art of chivalry as a noble art that provides an income and requires strength, courage, superior equestrian abilities, military might, and the ability to protect and defend territory. Here (fol.138r), in the company of his ministers and other companions, a young Mughal prince astride a powerful horse attempts to catch a lance. In the lower part of the painting, a young man holds a tabarzin (axe) in his left hand while moving his right hand to his mouth. His index finger touches his lips, a sign of astonishment at this demonstration of equestrian skill.

    A notation at the bottom of the page assigns the painting to Ganga Singh, whose name is found on other Mughal royal manuscripts from the mid 1580s until 1604. Ganga Singh was highly influenced by Farrukh Chela.

    See AKM288 for an introduction to a manuscript of the Ethics of Nasir (Akhlaq-i Nasiri) and links to the other paintings within this manuscript.


    — Filiz Çakır Phillip

     

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